Banned Books Week: Our right to read, September 24-30, 2017

Maggie Jacoby's blog

Frequently Challenged Books with Diverse Content

Mon, 09/19/2016 - 20:25 -- Maggie Jacoby
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This year's Banned Books Week is celebrating diversity. Below is a selection of books by diverse authors or containing diverse content that have been frequently challenged and/or banned.
While diversity is seldom given as a reason for a challenge, it seems, in fact, to be an underlying and unspoken factor. These challenged works are often about people and issues which include LGBTQIA, people of color, gender diversity, people with disabilities, and ethnic, cultural, and religious minorities—people or issues that, perhaps, challengers would prefer not to consider. 
 

Banned Books Week Spotlights Diversity in 2016

Tue, 02/23/2016 - 10:29 -- Maggie Jacoby
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Why are so many diverse books banned? The 2016 celebration of Banned Books Week will examine this important question as part of its thematic focus on diversity, the event's national coalition announced today. Banned Books Week, the annual celebration of the freedom to read, will run from September 25−October 1, 2016, and will be observed in thousands of libraries, schools, bookstores and other community settings across the nation and the world.

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Case Study: Persepolis

Sun, 09/27/2015 - 14:38 -- Maggie Jacoby
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For Banned Books Week, we are featuring case studies of banned and challenged Young Adult books. The first in this series is of the graphic novel, Persepolis. This case study first appeared on our sponsor, Comic Book Legal Defense Fund's, website. Persepolis, Marjane Satrapi’s graphic memoir of growing up during the Iranian Revolution, has received international acclaim since its initial publication in French. When it was released in English in 2003, both Time Magazine and the New York Times recognized it as one of the best books of the year. In 2007 it was adapted as an animated film, which was nominated for an Oscar and won the Cannes Film Festival Jury Prize and a French César. Although it was certainly controversial in the Middle East, there were no publicly reported challenges or bans of the book in U.S. schools or libraries until March 2013, when Chicago Public Schools administrators abruptly pulled it from some classrooms.

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